Hours of Idleness-A Photographer's Journey in St. Louis

History of Nature and Landscape Photography, Transition to Artform

George Shiras and John Hammerin a canoe equipped for jacklighting, Whitefish Lake, Michigan, 1893; © National Geographic Creative Archives

Around the beginning of the 20th Century, significant innovations in camera technology, chemistry, and photographic equipment coalesced at a time when photographers were beginning to recognize the expressive potential of their image-making. An era was fast dawning wherein the photograph would no longer be simply relegated to the realm of science or to cheap novelty, but would instead serve to drive culture, both in and out of art.

(more…)

Advertisements

Friday Night Music Video- 2019, Vol. 2

Posted in Interlude, Jason Gray by Jason Gray on April 27, 2019

A day late, a buck short.

(more…)

Fuji X-E3

—-

I’ve been shooting on Fujifilm now since December, so I figured that’s long enough to beginning offering practical reviews of my experiences with that equipment. Up first is the Fuji X-E3, a nimble, lightweight, rangefinder-styled mirrorless shooter that both appeals to specific needs in photography and to the photo everyman (that’s a feat in itself).

(more…)

Friday Night Music Video- 2019, Vol. 1

Posted in friday night music video, Jason Gray by Jason Gray on April 19, 2019

Ages ago on this blog, I used to do a Friday Night Music Video. In celebration of nostalgia, I’m bringing it back indefinitely. Enjoy…

(more…)

History of Nature and Landscape Photography, The Beginnings

Sir Henry Fox Talbot; early 1840’s

—-

Photography has had a preoccupation with nature almost from the very beginning. In fact, it was probably a preoccupation with nature that led to photography in the first place. The Pencil of Nature was a photobook published in the mid-1840’s by Sir Henry Fox Talbot, who was the first to successfully develop a reproducible negative.

(more…)

Chouteau Island

—-

The Mississippi River provides so much recreational diversity throughout its over 2,300 miles, across ten U.S. States. In Missouri, the river bottom is a place that makes all of the life around it possible. It also carries the weight of death, in the form of floods and drought.

(more…)

Hickory Canyons Natural Area

—-

I am well aware that much of the country does not think of Missouri first when they think of “outdoor adventure”, and that’s just fine. As a state positioned dead center in the continental U.S., we enjoy an abundance of resources that result from being a point of convergence: the convergence of cultures (and the legacies of those cultures- often this is a struggle too), the convergence of the largest rivers in North America, the convergence of a once sprawling ocean and once soaring mountains, lost in time, but leaving a geological uniqueness found little elsewhere on Earth. It’s all here, and frankly, if you want to flyover it, that’s fine too; it just keeps the crowds down for those of us that choose to revel in it.

(more…)

Rainy Day Hiking and Nature Photography

—-

Cool, rainy days are for Netflix, cocoa and the couch, right? Well, sort of. I believe that they also offer some of the most fun hiking around, and some of the best conditions for nature and landscape photography. In fact, I think that just about any weather event is a good opportunity to get outside (not that I hate sunny days- they are just less interesting, photographically).

(more…)

Forest Park on a Sunny Afternoon

Posted in Adventure, art, Fuji, Hike, Interlude, Jason Gray, Park, photography, prime lens, prime lenses, St. Louis by Jason Gray on March 17, 2019

Fuji X-E3 w/Rokinon 12mm f/2

—-

A couple of months ago, after picking up my new Fuji kit, I decided to test out the system with a leisurely stroll through St. Louis’ largest, and possibly, most photogenic public park. Forest Park is so large that experiences to be had are extremely varied. You can feel almost completely removed from the city on any of its many meandering trails, or totally engulfed by the heights of cultural achievement at one of the Park’s Museums or its outdoor theaters. The Park even boasts an internationally recognized zoo that is frequently listed at the top of “best of” lists for the U.S.

(more…)

St. Francois State Park

—-

St. Francois State Park is a pleasant park with a surprising variety of landscapes to explore. On our visit, we hiked the shortish Mooner’s Hollow Trail (2.75 miles), but still found ourselves transported through Ozark fens and glades, past a gentle cascade, and even across bridge-less streams. Our son, Harper surprised himself (and us) when he slipped into a creek (!!). The cool water was a relief, however, and he was quickly all smiles.

(more…)